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My Tolkien Books

My Tolkien Books

Here is a list of books written by or about J.R.R. Tolkien that I currently have in my library. In my posts I will refer to the books by their short name, indicated below in bold face. Variations in publication date or edition will be noted in parenthesis.

The Reader

The Tolkien Reader, by J.R.R. Tolkien, published in 1975 by Ballantine Books, by arrangement with Houghton Mifflin Company, and with the kind permission of the author and of George Allen & Unwin Ltd.

The Hobbit

The Hobbit or There and Back Again (Revised Edition, 1986), by J.R.R. Tolkien, published in 1986 by First Ballantine Books, a division of Random House, Inc, by arrangement with Houghton Mifflin Company.

The Hobbit or There and Back Again, (2007) by J.R.R. Tolkien, published in 2007 by HarperCollins, based on that published in 1995 by HarperCollins.

The Lord of the Rings

The Lord of the Rings, (1986) by J.R.R. Tolkien, published in 1986 by Ballantine Books, a division of Random House, Inc., by arrangement with Houghton Mifflin Company.

The Lord of the Rings, (1994) by J.R.R. Tolkien, published in 1994 by Houghton Mifflin Company.

The Silmarillion

The Silmarillion, by J.R.R. Tolkien, published in 1977 by Houghton Mifflin Company.

The Letters

The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien, selected and edited by Humphrey Carpenter, with the assistance of Christopher Tolkien, published in 1981 by Houghton Mifflin Company Boston.

The Story Of Kullervo

The Story Of Kullervo, by J.R.R. Tolkien, Edited by Verlyn Flieger, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2016

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"I found not being able to use a pen or a pencil as defeating as the loss of her beak would be to a hen."

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Quote from The Letters of J. …